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Update: The Estate of Prince, Two Years Later…

Update: The Estate of Prince, Two Years Later…

 

UPDATE:  THE ESTATE OF PRINCE, TWO YEARS LATER

The world mourned the death of Prince on April 21, 2016.  After the initial shock of his death, apparently from a drug overdose, passed, his estate became a central issue with his surviving relatives.

Right after his death, I wrote that his probate estate would be a mess:

https://www.legacylawmissouri.com/prince-died-what-about-estate/

Unfortunately, I was right.

First, none of his heirs have received a dime from the probate estate.  That’s in part because Prince had not even created a will, which complicated things initially because hundreds of people came out of the woodwork claiming to be related to the singer.

Since then, it has been determined that his six surviving siblings will share equally in his estate.  However, there’s an ongoing issue:  The executor of his estate and the IRS cannot agree on what the estate is worth.  Until they do, nothing can be distributed to the siblings.

So who is getting paid from the estate?  The executor and their lawyers have collected $5.9 million in fees and expenses.  They’ve requested additional fees already and more are obviously expected after that.

A rich celebrity like Prince should have had a will at the very least.  That was either a failure of him to follow advice from what you can only imagine was a team of managers, lawyers and accountants or, less likely, the advice was never given to him by his team which would be incredible incompetence.

Had Prince created a will, the beneficiaries of that will would have been determined right away.   The process would definitely be further along and likely the will would have contained terms regarding the assets of his estate and directions to the executor.

Had Prince created a properly funded living trust St. Peters (or series of trusts more likely) he could have avoided probate all together and his estate would be resolved in private.  It would be a quicker process and a much cheaper one.

And likely his heirs would already be spending their inheritance.

Gift Taxes 101

Gift Taxes 101

GIFT TAXES 101

Federal gift taxes are extremely confusing.  While it may seem odd to most people that even giving away your property can result in tax consequences, as we all know, with the IRS, rules are rules and they must be followed (or else).

As a wills and trust attorney O’Fallon, MO I often discuss gift taxes with my clients during our meetings to discuss estate planning.  Taxpayers have two exclusions or exemptions available to them, either on an annual basis or spread out over their lifetime.

The first is the annual gift tax exclusion.  This is a set amount of money you can give away tax free to an unlimited number of people.  A series of gifts made to the same person in a calendar year are not subject to gift if they don’t exceed the annual gift tax exclusion.  For 2017, this number was $14,000.  For 2018, there’s a bump to $15,000.

Here’s an example:  Say in January 2018, you give your son $5,000, then another $5,000 in April 2018 and then a final $5,000 in December 2018.  You’ve reached the cap for your son in 2018, but in January 2019 you could give them another $5,000, subject to the 2019 annual gift tax exclusion (not currently known).

Gifts can also be in kind.  You can give stock, jewelry, or artwork for example tax-free as long as they don’t exceed $15,000.

If you’re married, you and your spouse each get an annual gift tax exclusion, so in the example above, your son could receive $30,000 in 2018.

The lifetime gift tax exemption is the total amount you can give away over your lifetime.  These gifts are also free from tax.  However, the total amount gifted over your lifetime will reduce the amount of exemption to protect your estate from estate tax at your death.

The good news is the estate tax exemption has been indexed to inflation as of 2013, which means it increases each year.  Additionally, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed at the end of 2017, raises the exemption per spouse to $11.18 million in 2018.  This is indeed a good problem to have.

Gifting is part of the estate planning process for certain individuals who are either concerned about taxes on their estate or want to help family members financially without incurring tax.  Provisions in a living trust and powers of attorney often discuss taxes and the ability of trustees and/or powers of attorney to reduce taxes owed.

If you’re interested in gifting always remember that these opportunities require compliance with IRS regulations, including special filings.  You should always obtain professional advice from a CPA or a tax attorney before considering gifting.

Trust Administration in Missouri…

Trust Administration in Missouri…

TRUST ADMINISTRATION IN MISSOURI

               Over the years, I have had the honor to serve as a trustee of a few living trusts, as my clients have requested.  It is an honor for these clients to choose me to help execute their estate plans and to work with their chosen trust beneficiaries in Missouri.

As a trust lawyer O’Fallon Missouri, it is interesting to see how things work in reality after a client has passed away.  I’ve always been pleasantly surprised at how much easier the process is than probate and a much less stressful process at that.

When a client passes away and I am the successor trustee, my job is to immediately secure all of the trust assets and to ascertain who are the beneficiaries of the trust.  It’s also my job to collect all the mail of the client to learn about any debts they may have.  This usually means having their mail forwarded to my office so that I can keep tabs on any amounts owed.

Because a revocable trust becomes irrevocable when the grantor (creator) dies, I have to obtain a tax identification number (TIN) from the IRS.  With the trust documents and the TIN in hand, I can visit the client’s bank of choice and access all funds held by the trust.  If the funds are payable on death to the trust, the process is a little different but I will still create a trust account to hold all the liquidated assets of the trust estate.

Assets like houses and cars have to be accessed and determined whether they are to go directly to a beneficiary via the trust.  If so, I make arrangements to work with that beneficiary to transfer that asset to them.  In a recent case, there was a mortgage against the property but very little cash.  The house was very nice but needed some money put into it to get it on the market.  Finding the right balance for this kind of situation is part of the job of the trustee.  In this particular case, we opted to stage the house but not to do things like paint it – we figured we could sell potential buyers on the fact that they could get it painted the color they want.  It turned out to be a great strategy.

Communication with beneficiaries is an important part of being a trustee.  In addition to providing a copy of the trust document to all beneficiaries, it’s important for the trustee to be proactive in letting beneficiaries know what’s going on and when they can expect their distribution of funds (or property) from the trust estate.

Finally, most trust documents empower the trustee to hire just about anyone they need to administer trust business, including financial advisors, attorneys and accountants.  It’s important that the trustee not moonlight as they are a fiduciary responsible to maintain trust funds for the beneficiaries.  Any loss attributed to malfeasance (investing in penny stocks resulting in financial loss, for example) by the trustee can result in personal liability.

Trust administration is a very complex area of law and requires the expertise of a trust administration lawyer O’Fallon, Missouri.

 

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

               As an experienced estate planning lawyer St. Charles, I spend much of my time explaining to clients what estate planning is and how it works.  Estate planning is the use of legal documents to not only distribute your assets when you pass away, but to name people to make decisions for you if you become disabled and/or incapacitated.

Overview of Estate Planning Documents

Common estate planning documents include a living trust, last will and testament, medical power of attorney, healthcare directive and financial power of attorney.

A living trust can help you avoid probate and provide rules about when your beneficiaries receive their inheritance.  An example would be creating a provision where your beneficiary only receives their inheritance when they reach a certain age.  That age is up to you and depends on your specific situation.

As one of the top estate planning lawyer St. Charles, you can count on me to also review the purpose of having a last will and testament, which is another document which can distribute property when you pass away.  If you have a living trust, the will usually leaves the property to the trust, not directly to a beneficiary.

Power of attorney documents allow you to name a spouse to make financial and healthcare decisions for you if you become incapacitated.  An example would be naming your adult children to do banking for you if you had dementia.  A medical power of attorney could name the same adult child to work with doctors if the dementia advanced to a point where you were considered mentally incapacitated by a doctor.

Choosing the Right Estate Planning Lawyer

You should feel comfort with the skill level and personality of any lawyer you meet with.  Many attorneys practice in too many areas of law, which reduces their effectiveness in all areas of law that they practice.  Therefore, you should focus on choosing a lawyer that practices almost exclusively in this area.

Making estate planning decisions is intensely personal due to everyone having different family dynamics, levels of wealth and health and concerns about the ability of children to make smart decisions if they inherit your nest egg.  There are many different components to determining how your estate plan is created and it’s important that we discuss all of the aspects that help you identify these components.

An initial meeting to discuss your situation will include who should be in charge of distributing your inheritance, who your beneficiaries are and specifics about their personality and what assets you have.  Our focus is always on identifying client concerns and worries, client goals and educating clients on how the documents we are drafting resolve their concerns and accomplish their goals.  If you’re in need of an estate planning lawyer St. Charles, contact Legacy Law Center today.

 

AVOIDING PROBATE: IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT MONEY…

AVOIDING PROBATE: IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT MONEY…

As an estate planning attorney, a central goal that I preach is for my clients to avoid probate. Most of my clients associate probate with something akin to the plague and people like bankers, insurance agents, financial advisors, TV hosts and society at large have done a good job educating clients on the simple premise that they should avoid probate at all costs.

But why? Most people would guess the expense. That is certainly a legitimate reason. In Missouri, a probate administration can lead to costs to the court, big expenses being paid to your personal representative (also known as the executor) and, if you want the easy version of probate in Missouri, independent administration, the services of a knowledgeable and experienced probate attorney.

In a recent probate, an approximately $450,000 estate ended up costing about $1,000 in costs to the court for filing fees, inventory fees and various other expenses and approximately $31,000 in fees split equally between the personal representative and attorney .

That’s a lot of money and completely avoidable with estate planning. But to me the underrated reasons to avoid probate are:

1. Time

In Missouri, an estate cannot be closed for at least six months. Best case, therefore, you are looking at a 180 day process. In most cases, you can add at least a couple of months, if not more.  In some cases, the estate won’t be closed for at least a year, sometimes longer. So, not only have you lost a loved one, but now as a beneficiary or heir of an estate you have to wait a long time to get your inheritance!

2. Complexity

I work on probates every day and while I do a great job for my clients I have to say….I don’t like doing them.  St. Charles County has a terrific probate division but many of my probates are in St. Louis County and they are a nightmare to deal with.  Every county has a different set of procedural details that must constantly be adhered to, which is tough because those details seem to change by the month. Probates are comparable to getting your teeth pulled. The smallest details can delay them for days and even weeks.

3. Family Issues

Imagine with your family who would be more than a little bit anxious / conspiratorial about an inheritance owed to them. If someone makes out a will and then dies, unlike on TV, there is generally not a reading of the will. That is largely a Hollywood created fiction. In larger estates with a variety of distant relation family members or different beneficiaries (like people that don’t know each other), it might make sense to have a will reading. So people think that something is being hidden from them when the personal representative and the attorney for the estate don’t just cut them a check. Probates cause family tensions and in families where there is already tension, it can only aggravate things.

Conclusion

Here’s the silver lining: It is easier than ever to avoid probate with a living trust or even without a living trust under some circumstances. All you need to do first is sit down and meet with an estate planning lawyer to find out how. Heck, our office offers a free initial consultation. By the end of that meeting, you’ll know what you need and how much it costs…and how much avoiding probate will save you.