Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare

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WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

               As an experienced estate planning lawyer St. Charles, I spend much of my time explaining to clients what estate planning is and how it works.  Estate planning is the use of legal documents to not only distribute your assets when you pass away, but to name people to make decisions for you if you become disabled and/or incapacitated.

Overview of Estate Planning Documents

Common estate planning documents include a living trust, last will and testament, medical power of attorney, healthcare directive and financial power of attorney.

A living trust can help you avoid probate and provide rules about when your beneficiaries receive their inheritance.  An example would be creating a provision where your beneficiary only receives their inheritance when they reach a certain age.  That age is up to you and depends on your specific situation.

As one of the top estate planning lawyer St. Charles, you can count on me to also review the purpose of having a last will and testament, which is another document which can distribute property when you pass away.  If you have a living trust, the will usually leaves the property to the trust, not directly to a beneficiary.

Power of attorney documents allow you to name a spouse to make financial and healthcare decisions for you if you become incapacitated.  An example would be naming your adult children to do banking for you if you had dementia.  A medical power of attorney could name the same adult child to work with doctors if the dementia advanced to a point where you were considered mentally incapacitated by a doctor.

Choosing the Right Estate Planning Lawyer

You should feel comfort with the skill level and personality of any lawyer you meet with.  Many attorneys practice in too many areas of law, which reduces their effectiveness in all areas of law that they practice.  Therefore, you should focus on choosing a lawyer that practices almost exclusively in this area.

Making estate planning decisions is intensely personal due to everyone having different family dynamics, levels of wealth and health and concerns about the ability of children to make smart decisions if they inherit your nest egg.  There are many different components to determining how your estate plan is created and it’s important that we discuss all of the aspects that help you identify these components.

An initial meeting to discuss your situation will include who should be in charge of distributing your inheritance, who your beneficiaries are and specifics about their personality and what assets you have.  Our focus is always on identifying client concerns and worries, client goals and educating clients on how the documents we are drafting resolve their concerns and accomplish their goals.  If you’re in need of an estate planning lawyer St. Charles, contact Legacy Law Center today.

 

Missouri Healthcare Power Of Attorney

Missouri Healthcare Power Of Attorney

MISSOURI HEALTHCARE POWER OF ATTORNEY: A must-have estate planning document

This article focuses on the importance of having a Missouri healthcare power of attorney and what it does. A Missouri healthcare power of attorney is a document in which you name a power of attorney, called an “agent”, to make healthcare decisions for you if you become incapacitated and cannot make them yourself.

In Missouri, the document allows you to state whether you want one or two doctors to determine if you are incapacitated. The state standard is two doctors, but you can opt out and decide one.

Once you are incapacitated, your agent can not only meet with your doctors and review your medical records, but decide:

* what type of treatment
* which doctor / which hospital
* whether to put you into skill nursing or other long term care facilities such as assisted living
* whether to put you into hospice, either at home or at a facility
* whether to withhold artificially nutrition and hydration (tube feeding), if you specifically grant that power to your agent

So, in a nutshell, your Missouri healthcare power of attorney literally puts you life into the hands of another person. That should usually be your spouse or an adult child (or children together if you think they can make decisions together). But it’s important to point out that you can choose whoever you want to make these decisions and generally that should be a person nearby who’s judgment you trust and who you are sure will act if necessary.

In the document you can also decide whether you want to donate organs and provide specifics about your wishes as to when you pass away if you want to be buried or cremated and information about the type of funeral services you want. It also contains a HIPAA Waiver which will ensure that your agent can review your medical records as needed and discuss your care with your doctor(s).

You should also have the second part of a Missouri healthcare power of attorney, which is a Missouri healthcare directive (sometimes referred to as a Missouri living will), which at our office is a second part of the healthcare power of attorney document. The point of the healthcare directive is to provide detailed instructions to your agent if you are terminally ill or persistently unconscious (a coma, for example). You want to prevent your agent from having to guess how far to take medical treatment if you are not able to decide and that’s the point of this document. It’s invaluable to provide these instructions to your agent so they don’t have to guess, which puts both of you potentially in a tough spot.

A Missouri healthcare power of attorney document can be drafted by an experienced Missouri estate planning or elder law attorney.

Estate Planning For Children Struggling With Addiction

Estate Planning For Children Struggling With Addiction

 

ESTATE PLANNING FOR CHILDREN STRUGGLING WITH ADDICTION

 Many parents who have children struggling with addiction or mental illness are often too consumed with caring for those children in the present to given thoughts about who and how those children will be cared for when they are gone. 

It’s a question I ask just about all of my estate planning clients who have children…do your children now or have they struggled in the past with alcohol, drugs, gambling or mental illness?  I’ll remind those clients that there is no stigma about their children’s addiction in my office.  I’m there to help and frank discussion of this issue is unavoidable for proper estate planning. 

So how might estate planning differ in this situation?

We start with a couple of baseline rules.  First, we acknowledge that an addicted child may never recover.  Second, because the child may never recover, we must ensure that the child never has easy access to funds, even if non-addicted children do have easy access. 

A special purpose trust is often the answer.  They offer traditional estate planning goals such as avoiding probate, minimizing taxes and ensuring the intended beneficiaries are named, but also can be tailored for unique family situations involving addiction.  Parents can include language that allows the trustee to deal with both the good and bad, including incentivizing the child to meet certain goals or requirements to receive a distribution from the trust.  An example would be staying sober as evidenced by a drug test or staying on a certain medication that helps the child control their addiction.

In 2017, delaying distributions of principal, as I’ve discussed in prior articles, is not always a bad thing.  As with estate planning for children who are spendthrifts, not distributing assets means they will be invested with a competent financial advisor instead, meaning the money should grow.  If the addiction problem worsens, this provides more resources to fight the addiction.  If the addiction problem recedes, the trustee has more resources to support the child and to encourage their growth through education and career changes.    

Another consideration for proper planning should be to have the child execute a healthcare power of attorney and HIPAA release after they reach 18.  These documents could allow you to help a child in crisis.  Without these documents, you have no legal authority to speak with doctors and discuss medical records and decisions.  While these documents can of course be revoked by your child, having them in place first is preferable to not having them at all. 

Estate planning for addictive children is different but much the same.  With careful consideration you can ensure that you protect your child from their addiction and from themselves. 

Where Do I Keep My Estate Plan?

Where Do I Keep My Estate Plan?

Where Do I Keep My Estate Plan?

New clients of Legacy Law Center often arrive for our first conference with their existing estate plan documents. More often than not, these documents are out of order and have the look of paper that has never been read. They are sometimes still in envelopes that have never been opened. So we spend the first five minutes of the office unbundling all of these documents to see what these documents say.

A policy at our office is that finished estate plans are always put in binders and every document is tabbed in the binder so that it can be easily found. Part of our final instructions also informs the client where to keep their documents.

Those instructions are always the same. The originals in the binder should always be kept in a safe place, and either locked up or not locked up depending on the client’s preference and circumstances. Some clients want them locked away and that works fine as long as the person named in the document as power of attorney / executor / trustee has a copy and knows how to get the locked up originals.

I am not a huge fan of safe deposit boxes at banks. For one thing, if you need to get those documents in a pinch and it’s after business hours or a Sunday, you’re out of luck. Another issue is the cost. I just don’t think the utility of a safe deposit box is worth the cost. Clients can use safe deposit boxes, however, if they want to. The better bet is to have them tucked away in a safe at home. That will likely be cheaper, still provide security and resolve the issue of obtaining the documents at any time.

At our office, we also give the clients a set of copies and a PDF scan of the signed estate plan. The latter version makes it very easy to get a copy to the people they have chosen to be in charge in the future. All our clients have to do is forward the PDF to them via email or if they prefer, on a thumb drive or CD. Whatever works for them.

We also always advise our clients that they should immediately provide a copy of their signed healthcare power of attorney and healthcare directive to their primary care physician (their “PCP”) and any specialists they see (cardiologist or neurologist for example). A copy of the documents should always be out in a place where it can be grabbed quickly, such as a kitchen drawer or a file in a home office. Finally, we advise clients to put a copy in their car. If you get a call that your spouse has been taken to the hospital and you are at work, all you have to do is drive to the hospital. Bring a copy when you travel as well. Let’s face it, accidents are more likely to happen when you are trying out scuba diving in Aruba than when you are sitting at home reading the paper. So bring powers of attorney documents with you on your trip.

Your documents can be changed at any time as long as you have capacity, so keep in mind if you have a falling out with your executor or your power of attorney that you can put someone else in charge if you change the documents. It’s a very easy process and more affordable than most people assume.

The bottomline is that you should protect your estate plan from prying eyes and being lost by putting them in the place you think is best. If that’s the bank or a drawer at your house, it doesn’t matter. Just make sure you know where they are and that the people in charge of your life if you can’t be have a copy as well. If you do that, you’ll ensure that your estate plan can be followed as you originally intended.

A Guide to Caretaking for an Elderly Parent: Part 1 – Estate Planning

A Guide to Caretaking for an Elderly Parent: Part 1 – Estate Planning

A Guide to Caretaking for an Elderly Parent: Part 1 – Estate Planning

One of the first steps a person caring for their elderly parent should look into is whether they have an estate plan.  Do they have a will?  Is there a financial power of attorney?  Does Mom have a healthcare directive or living will?

These are just a few of the questions that Part 1 of my blog post series “A Guide to Caretaking for an Elderly Parent” will discuss.

But first, a reality check.  People in your position often feel embarrassed that they don’t know about Mom or Dad’s finances, the specifics of what medications they take or where they do their banking.  They also feel inadequate that they are not doing enough.  Take solace in knowing that this is very normal.  There is no course in college or many ways to prepare for suddenly becoming the parent for your own parents.  That’s just how it is.  You’re going to need to get used to the fact that this is all new, that’s it’s all happening fast and that you can make mistakes and learn from them.  It’s just like parenting really.  There’s the plan and then there’s life.

Okay, with that out of the way, the first step you need to take is to review what legal documents your parent or parents have put together as part of their estate plan.  Look around the house, ask their financial advisor.  Are you the power of attorney for Dad?  Where is the document?  I advise most clients that I do estate planning for to keep their documents in a place that their family can find them, rather than locked up.  Start with a search with that in mind.

If your parents don’t have any planning, the next step is to meet with an estate planning attorney like myself so they can  determine whether Mom or Dad (or both) have capacity to create an estate plan.  That is, do they have the legal ability to make and understand a power of attorney, a will, a living will or a trust?  An attorney can make that determination after meeting with them.

If they can make an estate plan, get that done as soon as possible.  You’ll need the power of attorney to help them do things like banking, dealing with doctor appointments and filing taxes.

If they do not have capacity, the attorney you meet with may suggest that you get guardianship and perhaps conservatorship over your parent.  That means that you will need to file paperwork in the court where they live to be appointed as the legal decision maker (guardian) and financial decision maker (conservator) for them.  If Mom does not have capacity, a doctor will indicate that by completing documentation supporting your guardianship petition.  The downside is that this may take a couple of months to get resolved.  However, once Letters of Guardianship and Conservatorship are awarded, you may assist your parent with whatever they need.  You are legally in charge of all the decision making related to their lives.

In Part 2 of “A Guide to Caretaking for an Elderly Parent” we will look at a crucial issue:  does Mom or Dad stay at home or do they need to go into long term care?