Revocable Trust

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Update: The Estate of Prince, Two Years Later…

Update: The Estate of Prince, Two Years Later…

 

UPDATE:  THE ESTATE OF PRINCE, TWO YEARS LATER

The world mourned the death of Prince on April 21, 2016.  After the initial shock of his death, apparently from a drug overdose, passed, his estate became a central issue with his surviving relatives.

Right after his death, I wrote that his probate estate would be a mess:

https://www.legacylawmissouri.com/prince-died-what-about-estate/

Unfortunately, I was right.

First, none of his heirs have received a dime from the probate estate.  That’s in part because Prince had not even created a will, which complicated things initially because hundreds of people came out of the woodwork claiming to be related to the singer.

Since then, it has been determined that his six surviving siblings will share equally in his estate.  However, there’s an ongoing issue:  The executor of his estate and the IRS cannot agree on what the estate is worth.  Until they do, nothing can be distributed to the siblings.

So who is getting paid from the estate?  The executor and their lawyers have collected $5.9 million in fees and expenses.  They’ve requested additional fees already and more are obviously expected after that.

A rich celebrity like Prince should have had a will at the very least.  That was either a failure of him to follow advice from what you can only imagine was a team of managers, lawyers and accountants or, less likely, the advice was never given to him by his team which would be incredible incompetence.

Had Prince created a will, the beneficiaries of that will would have been determined right away.   The process would definitely be further along and likely the will would have contained terms regarding the assets of his estate and directions to the executor.

Had Prince created a properly funded living trust St. Peters (or series of trusts more likely) he could have avoided probate all together and his estate would be resolved in private.  It would be a quicker process and a much cheaper one.

And likely his heirs would already be spending their inheritance.

Gift Taxes 101

Gift Taxes 101

GIFT TAXES 101

Federal gift taxes are extremely confusing.  While it may seem odd to most people that even giving away your property can result in tax consequences, as we all know, with the IRS, rules are rules and they must be followed (or else).

As a wills and trust attorney O’Fallon, MO I often discuss gift taxes with my clients during our meetings to discuss estate planning.  Taxpayers have two exclusions or exemptions available to them, either on an annual basis or spread out over their lifetime.

The first is the annual gift tax exclusion.  This is a set amount of money you can give away tax free to an unlimited number of people.  A series of gifts made to the same person in a calendar year are not subject to gift if they don’t exceed the annual gift tax exclusion.  For 2017, this number was $14,000.  For 2018, there’s a bump to $15,000.

Here’s an example:  Say in January 2018, you give your son $5,000, then another $5,000 in April 2018 and then a final $5,000 in December 2018.  You’ve reached the cap for your son in 2018, but in January 2019 you could give them another $5,000, subject to the 2019 annual gift tax exclusion (not currently known).

Gifts can also be in kind.  You can give stock, jewelry, or artwork for example tax-free as long as they don’t exceed $15,000.

If you’re married, you and your spouse each get an annual gift tax exclusion, so in the example above, your son could receive $30,000 in 2018.

The lifetime gift tax exemption is the total amount you can give away over your lifetime.  These gifts are also free from tax.  However, the total amount gifted over your lifetime will reduce the amount of exemption to protect your estate from estate tax at your death.

The good news is the estate tax exemption has been indexed to inflation as of 2013, which means it increases each year.  Additionally, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed at the end of 2017, raises the exemption per spouse to $11.18 million in 2018.  This is indeed a good problem to have.

Gifting is part of the estate planning process for certain individuals who are either concerned about taxes on their estate or want to help family members financially without incurring tax.  Provisions in a living trust and powers of attorney often discuss taxes and the ability of trustees and/or powers of attorney to reduce taxes owed.

If you’re interested in gifting always remember that these opportunities require compliance with IRS regulations, including special filings.  You should always obtain professional advice from a CPA or a tax attorney before considering gifting.

Trust Administration in Missouri…

Trust Administration in Missouri…

TRUST ADMINISTRATION IN MISSOURI

               Over the years, I have had the honor to serve as a trustee of a few living trusts, as my clients have requested.  It is an honor for these clients to choose me to help execute their estate plans and to work with their chosen trust beneficiaries in Missouri.

As a trust lawyer O’Fallon Missouri, it is interesting to see how things work in reality after a client has passed away.  I’ve always been pleasantly surprised at how much easier the process is than probate and a much less stressful process at that.

When a client passes away and I am the successor trustee, my job is to immediately secure all of the trust assets and to ascertain who are the beneficiaries of the trust.  It’s also my job to collect all the mail of the client to learn about any debts they may have.  This usually means having their mail forwarded to my office so that I can keep tabs on any amounts owed.

Because a revocable trust becomes irrevocable when the grantor (creator) dies, I have to obtain a tax identification number (TIN) from the IRS.  With the trust documents and the TIN in hand, I can visit the client’s bank of choice and access all funds held by the trust.  If the funds are payable on death to the trust, the process is a little different but I will still create a trust account to hold all the liquidated assets of the trust estate.

Assets like houses and cars have to be accessed and determined whether they are to go directly to a beneficiary via the trust.  If so, I make arrangements to work with that beneficiary to transfer that asset to them.  In a recent case, there was a mortgage against the property but very little cash.  The house was very nice but needed some money put into it to get it on the market.  Finding the right balance for this kind of situation is part of the job of the trustee.  In this particular case, we opted to stage the house but not to do things like paint it – we figured we could sell potential buyers on the fact that they could get it painted the color they want.  It turned out to be a great strategy.

Communication with beneficiaries is an important part of being a trustee.  In addition to providing a copy of the trust document to all beneficiaries, it’s important for the trustee to be proactive in letting beneficiaries know what’s going on and when they can expect their distribution of funds (or property) from the trust estate.

Finally, most trust documents empower the trustee to hire just about anyone they need to administer trust business, including financial advisors, attorneys and accountants.  It’s important that the trustee not moonlight as they are a fiduciary responsible to maintain trust funds for the beneficiaries.  Any loss attributed to malfeasance (investing in penny stocks resulting in financial loss, for example) by the trustee can result in personal liability.

Trust administration is a very complex area of law and requires the expertise of a trust administration lawyer O’Fallon, Missouri.

 

The Future Of Retirement and The Importance Of The Revocable Trust

The Future Of Retirement and The Importance Of The Revocable Trust

The Future Of Retirement and The Importance Of The Revocable Trust

As an estate planning attorney, I have had an interesting viewpoint of how the Great Recession affected my estate planning clients. Over the last two or three years, I have noticed a consistent worry of clients during initial conferences. They seem to be more worried in some cases about their children’s ability to retire than their own.

It makes sense. The Great Recession had far reaching effects on our country’s economy and some of those effect are still being felt today. But those with investments, they have not only recovered their nest egg but since increased the size of it handsomely as the stock market has reached all time highs. Retirement age parents, however, are concerned about their children’s student loan debt, costs of housing, delayed family creation and just generally about their well being when they are gone.

I met with a client couple recently who told me that each of their children had graduate degrees from prestigious schools and were now out in the world. One found a job pretty quick since he is in software engineering, but is getting crushed by a $1,500 per month condo rental, plus $1,500 per month in student loans (for the next 30 years). The other child had graduated last year, could not find a job in our area in her chosen field (computer science) and had taken a job as an office assistant at a company in St. Louis. She lives with them.

Each of them told me that they had started watching their spending habits so that they could leave as much of an inheritance to their children as possible, despite their terrific educations and work habits. This is a sea change in estate planning for those with a decent amount of assets to leave to their children.  So what I recommended at the end of our initial conference was a living trust whereby they would each act as the trustees and then when the second spouse had passed away, a successor trustee would take over. In their case, that successor trustee was not their children but a younger brother of the husband.

When the second spouse dies, unlike is often the case in traditional revocable trust planning, the children will not inherit everything. The younger brother will manage the trust for a set number of years at which time the 50/50 split inheritance of each child would be distributed outright. That will be a considerable some based on the couple’s current assets. But the beauty of this delayed distribution is that since the inheritance of each child will not immediately be received it can be invested and grow.

In other words, we are creating a retirement plan for the children via their inheritance. Bills of the children can still be paid as a supplement by the trustee, but the principal remains invested. So upon the death of the second spouse, the balance of any student loans could be paid off but the significant money left can continue to grow. Meanwhile, since the kids have careers starting, they can continue to save for retirement themselves as well. If the inheritance was given to them right away, that may not be the case. The plan we created ensures the kids will have the best of both worlds: A retirement source via inheritance, which will grow from the delay of distribution and the retirement they create for themselves, which should be easier through the assistance of at least some of their bills being paid as needed by the trustee of the revocable trust.

As an aside, I am not a financial advisor but one significant way retirement planning has changed and will continue to change is the loss of guaranteed income. Pensions are largely a thing of the past and workers have to invest more into building a larger nest egg so that they can replace that lost pension check, if necessary, with a draw from the nest egg itself. Many of my clients still enjoy significantly high incomes from combined pensions and Social Security. This can leave their nest egg largely intact. However, their risk tolerance is much lower than someone like their children. This again reinforces the beauty of the plan I outlined above.