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4 Reasons To Consider Changing Your Estate Plan…

4 Reasons To Consider Changing Your Estate Plan…

 4 REASONS TO CONSIDER CHANGING YOUR ESTATE PLAN

              Creating an estate plan is an important way to protect your family from the uncertainty that might follow your death or disability.  However, after creating an estate plan, you must be certain that it still meets your particular needs and circumstances.   As an O’Fallon estate lawyer, I often consult with clients who want me to review their existing documents and there are generally four (4) reasons to consider making changes.

DIVORCE

If you have divorced your spouse that you created a living trust and powers of attorney with, you certainly want to make changes as soon after the divorce as possible.  Since in almost all cases your now ex-spouse was your beneficiary, executor and power of attorney, you’ll need to consider a new person to meet those needs.

DEATH OF A FAMILY MEMBER

If your spouse or another family member who was part of your estate plan has passed away, you’ll eventually want to have your last will and testament, revocable trust, all beneficiary deeds and living will examined to see what changes should be made.  It might be a good idea to consider a new beneficiary or you could consider leaving more to the surviving beneficiaries.  If the person who passed away was in charge of your estate when you pass or was an alternate, consider replacing them with another person who is suitable for that role.

ESTRANGEMENT

Perhaps you created an estate plan to benefit a child who you had a falling out with or who you no longer have contact with.  This can certainly be a difficult situation, but it may also affect how you feel about leaving them as a beneficiary of your estate.  In Missouri, as in most states, you can easily disinherit (remove) that child from your estate plan by amending your existing documents.  Often such removal is not complicated at all and will cost a fraction of what your original estate documents cost.  Remember too that if things are smoothed over with that child, you can easily add them back to your documents if you desire.

CHANGE IN CIRCUMSTANCES

This category is a little bit more general.  A common example is that most couples create a simplified estate plan when they have their children, primarily to name a guardian in their last will and testament.  Years later, however, this estate plan needs to be examined to see if it still makes sense.  Perhaps that baby boy is now a mature adult son and so you want to name them as an executor, trustee or attorney-in-fact to assist you down the road with your affairs.

Or maybe your financial situation, like most people, is much less simplified than it was decades ago.  As a general rule, the more assets you have the more important it is that you have a proper estate plan in place to ensure the least amount of chaos for your family.  That simple will made sense for your and your spouse when you were young parents with few assets.  But if you now have more assets and your children are grown, changes should seriously be considered.

I meet with people all the time in needs of an estate plan review.  Our office offers a free consultation and in almost all cases at the end of that consultation, I can suggest the changes your estate plan needs, what those changes will mean for you and how much it would cost.

What Happens To My Joint Trust If I Get Divorced?

What Happens To My Joint Trust If I Get Divorced?

 

 

What Happens To My Joint Trust If I Get A Divorce?

What Happens To My Joint Trust If I Get Divorced?

              Going through a divorce can be an extremely painful, stressful and seemingly unending process.  It affects so many different aspects of your life.  This article discusses just one of the effects, which is your estate planning, including your living trust, will and power of attorney documents.

What happens to my estate plan when I get divorced?

This is a great question and one that a qualified estate planning lawyer Dardenne Prairie can assist you with.  In Missouri, a divorce essentially treats any distributions intended for your ex-spouse as void.  In other words,  you have a will, it says that when you pass everything goes to your ex-spouse, but upon finalization of the divorce, that provision for your now ex-spouse is treated as if they have predeceased you and therefore the distribution would pass to your contingent beneficiaries, which would usually be your children.

What happens if I have assets that will avoid probate, such as a life insurance policy?

The Missouri law treating the ex-spouse as a voided beneficiary only covers assets in probate.  If you had a life insurance policy that left your soon to be ex-spouse as the primary beneficiary, you would need to change that after divorce, because if you pass away, your ex-spouse would inherit.  This happens all the time, unfortunately, and that’s why it’s important to have a game plan to review your estate plan (or establish one) after your divorce is final.

The second thing to note is that any distribution to your ex-spouse upon your passing is only void if the divorce is final.  If you expect your divorce to be extended for a period of time, it’s important to meet with an estate planning attorney to make changes anyway.  Under Missouri law, you can adjust your estate plan to cut out your soon to be ex-spouse.  You can’t completely cut them out (unless you have a prenuptial agreement or postnuptial agreement), but you can ensure that they will not inherit everything, which would be the case if you did nothing and passed before your divorce was finalized.

What happens if I have a trust and am getting divorced?

That depends on the type of joint trust you have.  An irrevocable trust attorney O’Fallon, Missouri  can explain in more detail, but the terms of this type of trust cannot be changed after the trust is created, regardless of divorce.  This type of joint trust, however, is usually created by spouses to benefit their children.

If, on the other hand, you have a revocable joint trust, both spouses can retain control over the assets.  Of course, this assumes you would want to do that.  Most of the time, spouses want to dissolve their trust and distribute assets as agreed in their marital settlement agreement.  From there, you can take the safest step and create a new estate plan with your own trust, a new will and new powers of attorney.  You’d probably want to do that anyway, since your now ex-spouse is usually listed as your principal in your healthcare power of attorney and durable power of attorney documents.

Do you really want your ex-spouse making healthcare calls for you at the end of life?  Me neither.

As you can see, the best practice, at a minimum, when you are going through a divorce is to sit down and review your estate plan with an experienced estate planning attorney.

 

 

Five Power of Attorney Myths…

Five Power of Attorney Myths…

FIVE POWER OF ATTORNEY MYTHS

Powers of attorney are documents where a person names a person (their “attorney”) to make healthcare and financial decisions for them if they are incapacitated.  Such incapacity could be temporary or permanent.  Some powers of attorney are drafted so that a person gives another person power to do something because they cannot.  An example would be giving your adult child power of attorney to sign closing documents for the sale of your home because you live out of state.

Power of attorney lawyer O’Fallon, Missouri can help you draft these very important documents which are a cornerstone of any estate plan.

There are a few myths about these documents and here are five of them:

  1. Any Power of Attorney Form Will Work

The Web is an all too easy place to find a form for anything these days.  However, with a power of attorney, every state has different rules and statutes to make the document legally binding.  Forms online are often too general, do not contain details that are appropriate to your specific situation and are ambiguous.  An even bigger problem is that by the time you discover the form document you printed doesn’t work, it’s too late.  See below.

  1. You Can Sign a Power of Attorney At Any Time

Many people are unaware that you have to be mentally competent in order to create a power of attorney.  However, very often a person needs a power of attorney because they are no longer competent.

Unfortunately, if that person is incompetent, it’s too late anda court has to determine whether the person should have a guardian and/or conservator appointed.  It’s a much more dragged out process, it’s costly and can be challenged by others.

Bottomline, if someone you know is in need of a power of attorney, don’t wait.  Act quickly before they lose competence.

  1. A Durable Power of Attorney Is Still Valid After Death

A power of attorney allows a person to make decisions for another only as long as they are alive.  Once a person passes away powers of attorney are invalid.  At death, the operating documents are the person’s will and/or trust.

For a healthcare power of attorney O’Fallon, Missouri, the last thing the agent can do is arrange the cremation or burial wishes of the deceased.  This is called the Right of Sepulcher.

  1. A Power of Attorney Allows a Person to Do Whatever They Want

A person chosen to be a power of attorney has a fiduciary duty to the principal, the person who gave them authority.  That means they have to act in the principal’s best interests at all times, even if it’s not stated in the document, which it usually isn’t.

It’s important to note, however, that fiduciary duties are broken all the time.  Therefore, it’s important that a person choose a trustworthy individual to be there power of attorney.  It also helps to name someone who knows a bit about financial matters and you know will act and act properly.

  1. If You’re Married, Your Spouse Is Already Your Power of Attorney

When it comes to a power of attorney, being married doesn’t automatically make your spouse your agent.  That doesn’t mean they can’t be your power of attorney but they’ll need to be named so in the document, just like anyone else.  You’ll also need alternates in case you and your spouse are both incapacitated at the same time.

For healthcare decisions, if you don’t have a healthcare power of attorney, you spouse is considered your first next of kin and can make decisions above anyone else.  But the next of kin after your spouse may not be your choice, so it’s necessary to create a healthcare power of attorney.  In so doing, you’ll also create a much needed healthcare directive, sometimes referred to as a living will or advanced directive.  This document provides end of life instructions about medical treatment you either would or would not want to have withheld if a doctor determines it can’t heal you.

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

WHAT IS ESTATE PLANNING?

               As an experienced estate planning lawyer St. Charles, I spend much of my time explaining to clients what estate planning is and how it works.  Estate planning is the use of legal documents to not only distribute your assets when you pass away, but to name people to make decisions for you if you become disabled and/or incapacitated.

Overview of Estate Planning Documents

Common estate planning documents include a living trust, last will and testament, medical power of attorney, healthcare directive and financial power of attorney.

A living trust can help you avoid probate and provide rules about when your beneficiaries receive their inheritance.  An example would be creating a provision where your beneficiary only receives their inheritance when they reach a certain age.  That age is up to you and depends on your specific situation.

As one of the top estate planning lawyer St. Charles, you can count on me to also review the purpose of having a last will and testament, which is another document which can distribute property when you pass away.  If you have a living trust, the will usually leaves the property to the trust, not directly to a beneficiary.

Power of attorney documents allow you to name a spouse to make financial and healthcare decisions for you if you become incapacitated.  An example would be naming your adult children to do banking for you if you had dementia.  A medical power of attorney could name the same adult child to work with doctors if the dementia advanced to a point where you were considered mentally incapacitated by a doctor.

Choosing the Right Estate Planning Lawyer

You should feel comfort with the skill level and personality of any lawyer you meet with.  Many attorneys practice in too many areas of law, which reduces their effectiveness in all areas of law that they practice.  Therefore, you should focus on choosing a lawyer that practices almost exclusively in this area.

Making estate planning decisions is intensely personal due to everyone having different family dynamics, levels of wealth and health and concerns about the ability of children to make smart decisions if they inherit your nest egg.  There are many different components to determining how your estate plan is created and it’s important that we discuss all of the aspects that help you identify these components.

An initial meeting to discuss your situation will include who should be in charge of distributing your inheritance, who your beneficiaries are and specifics about their personality and what assets you have.  Our focus is always on identifying client concerns and worries, client goals and educating clients on how the documents we are drafting resolve their concerns and accomplish their goals.  If you’re in need of an estate planning lawyer St. Charles, contact Legacy Law Center today.

 

Missouri Healthcare Power Of Attorney

Missouri Healthcare Power Of Attorney

MISSOURI HEALTHCARE POWER OF ATTORNEY: A must-have estate planning document

This article focuses on the importance of having a Missouri healthcare power of attorney and what it does. A Missouri healthcare power of attorney is a document in which you name a power of attorney, called an “agent”, to make healthcare decisions for you if you become incapacitated and cannot make them yourself.

In Missouri, the document allows you to state whether you want one or two doctors to determine if you are incapacitated. The state standard is two doctors, but you can opt out and decide one.

Once you are incapacitated, your agent can not only meet with your doctors and review your medical records, but decide:

* what type of treatment
* which doctor / which hospital
* whether to put you into skill nursing or other long term care facilities such as assisted living
* whether to put you into hospice, either at home or at a facility
* whether to withhold artificially nutrition and hydration (tube feeding), if you specifically grant that power to your agent

So, in a nutshell, your Missouri healthcare power of attorney literally puts you life into the hands of another person. That should usually be your spouse or an adult child (or children together if you think they can make decisions together). But it’s important to point out that you can choose whoever you want to make these decisions and generally that should be a person nearby who’s judgment you trust and who you are sure will act if necessary.

In the document you can also decide whether you want to donate organs and provide specifics about your wishes as to when you pass away if you want to be buried or cremated and information about the type of funeral services you want. It also contains a HIPAA Waiver which will ensure that your agent can review your medical records as needed and discuss your care with your doctor(s).

You should also have the second part of a Missouri healthcare power of attorney, which is a Missouri healthcare directive (sometimes referred to as a Missouri living will), which at our office is a second part of the healthcare power of attorney document. The point of the healthcare directive is to provide detailed instructions to your agent if you are terminally ill or persistently unconscious (a coma, for example). You want to prevent your agent from having to guess how far to take medical treatment if you are not able to decide and that’s the point of this document. It’s invaluable to provide these instructions to your agent so they don’t have to guess, which puts both of you potentially in a tough spot.

A Missouri healthcare power of attorney document can be drafted by an experienced Missouri estate planning or elder law attorney.