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Per Stirpes vs. Per Capita Distribution…

Per Stirpes vs. Per Capita Distribution in a Will

                One of the obvious benefits of having a will is you get to name the beneficiaries of your estate.  When I sit down as an estate planning lawyer St. Peters to meet people, they almost always have an idea of who is going to be their beneficiaries.

However, one thing that they often struggle to decide is how to divide their estate if one or more of their beneficiaries die before they do.

There are two options.  The first is called “per stirpes” distribution and it means that if a beneficiary predeceases, their share goes to their survivors equally.  The other option is called “per capita” distribution and it means that if a named beneficiary predeceases their share is then split only between the other name beneficiaries.

Let’s look at an example:

Sam and Sally have three children, Samuel, Sarah and Samantha.  They each create wills that leave everything to the other spouse and then to the children in equal 1/3 shares, per stirpes. Sam passes away and then Sarah passes away five years later.  Five years after that Sally dies.  Her will controls the distribution of her estate and because she chose per stirpes distribution, Samuel will get 1/3, Samantha will get 1/3 and Sarah’s two children, will each split Sarah’s 1/3 share and each will get 1/6.

With a per capita distribution scheme, under the same example Sarah’s 1/3 would be split between her brother Samuel and sister Samantha.  Sarah’s children would therefore receive nothing and Samuel and Samantha would each split the estate, ½ each.

You can see how the slightest change in one word (“stirpes” or “capita”) can result in a big change.  Therefore, when I counsel clients I discuss these different options thoroughly and ask about their relationship with grandchildren, the health of their children and any potential problems that could develop within the family (which we want to avoid) if one scheme is chosen over the others.

There’s not really a right or wrong way to choose which distribution you want in your will or living trust.  Based on my years of practice, I would say per stirpes is the choice of 90% of clients over per capita.  Most people think that’s the fairest way and are concerned about beneficiaries getting more due to someone else’s death.

On the other hand, per capita can be a better choice if we’re worried about a distribution to grandchildren going to an unpopular daughter or son-in-law.  That can happen when the distribution is made to the grandchild but taken improperly or used unnecessarily by their mother or father.  That’s something to consider if you find yourself with an in-law that you don’t like.

In the end, careful consideration of all circumstances and preferences has to be examined and peace of mind is ultimately the goal with any estate plan.

 

Update: The Estate of Prince, Two Years Later…

Update: The Estate of Prince, Two Years Later…

 

UPDATE:  THE ESTATE OF PRINCE, TWO YEARS LATER

The world mourned the death of Prince on April 21, 2016.  After the initial shock of his death, apparently from a drug overdose, passed, his estate became a central issue with his surviving relatives.

Right after his death, I wrote that his probate estate would be a mess:

https://www.legacylawmissouri.com/prince-died-what-about-estate/

Unfortunately, I was right.

First, none of his heirs have received a dime from the probate estate.  That’s in part because Prince had not even created a will, which complicated things initially because hundreds of people came out of the woodwork claiming to be related to the singer.

Since then, it has been determined that his six surviving siblings will share equally in his estate.  However, there’s an ongoing issue:  The executor of his estate and the IRS cannot agree on what the estate is worth.  Until they do, nothing can be distributed to the siblings.

So who is getting paid from the estate?  The executor and their lawyers have collected $5.9 million in fees and expenses.  They’ve requested additional fees already and more are obviously expected after that.

A rich celebrity like Prince should have had a will at the very least.  That was either a failure of him to follow advice from what you can only imagine was a team of managers, lawyers and accountants or, less likely, the advice was never given to him by his team which would be incredible incompetence.

Had Prince created a will, the beneficiaries of that will would have been determined right away.   The process would definitely be further along and likely the will would have contained terms regarding the assets of his estate and directions to the executor.

Had Prince created a properly funded living trust St. Peters (or series of trusts more likely) he could have avoided probate all together and his estate would be resolved in private.  It would be a quicker process and a much cheaper one.

And likely his heirs would already be spending their inheritance.

Gift Taxes 101

Gift Taxes 101

GIFT TAXES 101

Federal gift taxes are extremely confusing.  While it may seem odd to most people that even giving away your property can result in tax consequences, as we all know, with the IRS, rules are rules and they must be followed (or else).

As a wills and trust attorney O’Fallon, MO I often discuss gift taxes with my clients during our meetings to discuss estate planning.  Taxpayers have two exclusions or exemptions available to them, either on an annual basis or spread out over their lifetime.

The first is the annual gift tax exclusion.  This is a set amount of money you can give away tax free to an unlimited number of people.  A series of gifts made to the same person in a calendar year are not subject to gift if they don’t exceed the annual gift tax exclusion.  For 2017, this number was $14,000.  For 2018, there’s a bump to $15,000.

Here’s an example:  Say in January 2018, you give your son $5,000, then another $5,000 in April 2018 and then a final $5,000 in December 2018.  You’ve reached the cap for your son in 2018, but in January 2019 you could give them another $5,000, subject to the 2019 annual gift tax exclusion (not currently known).

Gifts can also be in kind.  You can give stock, jewelry, or artwork for example tax-free as long as they don’t exceed $15,000.

If you’re married, you and your spouse each get an annual gift tax exclusion, so in the example above, your son could receive $30,000 in 2018.

The lifetime gift tax exemption is the total amount you can give away over your lifetime.  These gifts are also free from tax.  However, the total amount gifted over your lifetime will reduce the amount of exemption to protect your estate from estate tax at your death.

The good news is the estate tax exemption has been indexed to inflation as of 2013, which means it increases each year.  Additionally, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed at the end of 2017, raises the exemption per spouse to $11.18 million in 2018.  This is indeed a good problem to have.

Gifting is part of the estate planning process for certain individuals who are either concerned about taxes on their estate or want to help family members financially without incurring tax.  Provisions in a living trust and powers of attorney often discuss taxes and the ability of trustees and/or powers of attorney to reduce taxes owed.

If you’re interested in gifting always remember that these opportunities require compliance with IRS regulations, including special filings.  You should always obtain professional advice from a CPA or a tax attorney before considering gifting.

Trust Administration in Missouri…

Trust Administration in Missouri…

TRUST ADMINISTRATION IN MISSOURI

               Over the years, I have had the honor to serve as a trustee of a few living trusts, as my clients have requested.  It is an honor for these clients to choose me to help execute their estate plans and to work with their chosen trust beneficiaries in Missouri.

As a trust lawyer O’Fallon Missouri, it is interesting to see how things work in reality after a client has passed away.  I’ve always been pleasantly surprised at how much easier the process is than probate and a much less stressful process at that.

When a client passes away and I am the successor trustee, my job is to immediately secure all of the trust assets and to ascertain who are the beneficiaries of the trust.  It’s also my job to collect all the mail of the client to learn about any debts they may have.  This usually means having their mail forwarded to my office so that I can keep tabs on any amounts owed.

Because a revocable trust becomes irrevocable when the grantor (creator) dies, I have to obtain a tax identification number (TIN) from the IRS.  With the trust documents and the TIN in hand, I can visit the client’s bank of choice and access all funds held by the trust.  If the funds are payable on death to the trust, the process is a little different but I will still create a trust account to hold all the liquidated assets of the trust estate.

Assets like houses and cars have to be accessed and determined whether they are to go directly to a beneficiary via the trust.  If so, I make arrangements to work with that beneficiary to transfer that asset to them.  In a recent case, there was a mortgage against the property but very little cash.  The house was very nice but needed some money put into it to get it on the market.  Finding the right balance for this kind of situation is part of the job of the trustee.  In this particular case, we opted to stage the house but not to do things like paint it – we figured we could sell potential buyers on the fact that they could get it painted the color they want.  It turned out to be a great strategy.

Communication with beneficiaries is an important part of being a trustee.  In addition to providing a copy of the trust document to all beneficiaries, it’s important for the trustee to be proactive in letting beneficiaries know what’s going on and when they can expect their distribution of funds (or property) from the trust estate.

Finally, most trust documents empower the trustee to hire just about anyone they need to administer trust business, including financial advisors, attorneys and accountants.  It’s important that the trustee not moonlight as they are a fiduciary responsible to maintain trust funds for the beneficiaries.  Any loss attributed to malfeasance (investing in penny stocks resulting in financial loss, for example) by the trustee can result in personal liability.

Trust administration is a very complex area of law and requires the expertise of a trust administration lawyer O’Fallon, Missouri.

 

Five Power of Attorney Myths…

Five Power of Attorney Myths…

FIVE POWER OF ATTORNEY MYTHS

Powers of attorney are documents where a person names a person (their “attorney”) to make healthcare and financial decisions for them if they are incapacitated.  Such incapacity could be temporary or permanent.  Some powers of attorney are drafted so that a person gives another person power to do something because they cannot.  An example would be giving your adult child power of attorney to sign closing documents for the sale of your home because you live out of state.

Power of attorney lawyer O’Fallon, Missouri can help you draft these very important documents which are a cornerstone of any estate plan.

There are a few myths about these documents and here are five of them:

  1. Any Power of Attorney Form Will Work

The Web is an all too easy place to find a form for anything these days.  However, with a power of attorney, every state has different rules and statutes to make the document legally binding.  Forms online are often too general, do not contain details that are appropriate to your specific situation and are ambiguous.  An even bigger problem is that by the time you discover the form document you printed doesn’t work, it’s too late.  See below.

  1. You Can Sign a Power of Attorney At Any Time

Many people are unaware that you have to be mentally competent in order to create a power of attorney.  However, very often a person needs a power of attorney because they are no longer competent.

Unfortunately, if that person is incompetent, it’s too late anda court has to determine whether the person should have a guardian and/or conservator appointed.  It’s a much more dragged out process, it’s costly and can be challenged by others.

Bottomline, if someone you know is in need of a power of attorney, don’t wait.  Act quickly before they lose competence.

  1. A Durable Power of Attorney Is Still Valid After Death

A power of attorney allows a person to make decisions for another only as long as they are alive.  Once a person passes away powers of attorney are invalid.  At death, the operating documents are the person’s will and/or trust.

For a healthcare power of attorney O’Fallon, Missouri, the last thing the agent can do is arrange the cremation or burial wishes of the deceased.  This is called the Right of Sepulcher.

  1. A Power of Attorney Allows a Person to Do Whatever They Want

A person chosen to be a power of attorney has a fiduciary duty to the principal, the person who gave them authority.  That means they have to act in the principal’s best interests at all times, even if it’s not stated in the document, which it usually isn’t.

It’s important to note, however, that fiduciary duties are broken all the time.  Therefore, it’s important that a person choose a trustworthy individual to be there power of attorney.  It also helps to name someone who knows a bit about financial matters and you know will act and act properly.

  1. If You’re Married, Your Spouse Is Already Your Power of Attorney

When it comes to a power of attorney, being married doesn’t automatically make your spouse your agent.  That doesn’t mean they can’t be your power of attorney but they’ll need to be named so in the document, just like anyone else.  You’ll also need alternates in case you and your spouse are both incapacitated at the same time.

For healthcare decisions, if you don’t have a healthcare power of attorney, you spouse is considered your first next of kin and can make decisions above anyone else.  But the next of kin after your spouse may not be your choice, so it’s necessary to create a healthcare power of attorney.  In so doing, you’ll also create a much needed healthcare directive, sometimes referred to as a living will or advanced directive.  This document provides end of life instructions about medical treatment you either would or would not want to have withheld if a doctor determines it can’t heal you.